God’s Endless Love

As we go deeper into Lent, we see Jesus calmly awaiting His Passion despite being troubled. He emphasizes that we should be willing to lose our life in order to preserve it for all eternity. Jesus was fully human, that is why He understands our fickleness (and even stupidity!) in responding to God’s love and initiative.

When Abraham successfully proved his faith, Yahweh promised abundant blessings aside from promising Abraham’s “descendants as countless as the stars of the sky and the sands of the seashore.” He even further assured that his descendants will “take possession of the gates of their enemies.” Such great love!

As Christians we are required to be faithful, and that we should listen to the Father’s voice telling us “This is my beloved Son, listen to Him. (Mt. 17: 5) In the early days, God revealed His laws which Moses casted in stone. Man’s shortsightedness leads him to the vanities of this world thus blinding him deeper into sin. Man continued to mock God’s messengers and “added infidelity to infidelity, despised His warnings and scoffed at His prophets. Such disrespect for the Creator inflamed the anger of the Lord against His people. He allowed them to be subjected to exile and suffering. Similarly, Jesus zeal for the Father’s House led Him to be angry at the way the House of God was corrupted by traders and the public doing business in the Temple Area. Despite the general hopelessness of His people, even “dead in our transgressions”, He still brought us to life with Christ – “by grace you were saved — raises us up with Him.”

God’s love prevails over anger such that “He gave His only begotten Son, so that everyone who believes in Him might have Eternal Life.” God love us despite the fact that we don’t deserve such patience and understanding, plainly because of His awesomeness; He who is rich in mercy, compassion and is slow to anger.

In today’s readings, the Prophet Jeremiah told that the Lord will place His “law within them and write it upon their hearts. I will be their God, and they shall be My people”. God created the Perfect Savior in Jesus so that by His faithfulness and obedience demonstrated by His patient suffering, showed His perfection which “became the source of salvation for all who obey Him.”

The Old Covenant was a failure, but God created a new covenant in Jesus, which we recognize and accept as the Perfect Savior every time we partake of Holy Communion at Mass.

As Holy Week draws near, may we all realize how sin leads us farther and away from God, our source of life and salvation. Despite the struggles and challenges we face every single day, may we see the purpose for it all, and inspire us to obedience and intimacy with Him. Admittedly, life is often a struggle, because there is a dream to be pursued, a vision to be attained. It is a journey of countless steps, countless meaningful steps, but each one leading to another.

“Whoever serves me follow me, says the Lord; and where I am, there also will my servant be.” (Jn. 12: 26)

Becoming Truly Ready for Him!

One of the most defining aspects of our homecoming journey as emphasized in the Code of Champions Seminar is our accountability towards the Creator. As Fr. Armand said, “Logically God does not deserve a corner of our lives or just a piece of our hearts. For us to enter the depths of His heart, we must give Him topmost priority over and above everything else in life.” This is the appropriate response to Yahweh who beckons and who desires that we seek and desire His love. While we are given the freedom to choose, God’s passionate love for us also ensures that we grow in obedience and intimacy with Him.

In today’s Gospel, Jesus found the temple area, the core symbol of God’s presence becoming a market place where people sold animals and birds, as well as the money changers doing business there. He made a whip out of cords and drove them all out of the temple area, with the sheep and oxen, and spilled the coins of the money changers and overturned their tables, and to those who sold doves he said, “Take these out of here, and stop making my Father’s house a marketplace.” At that time what really angered the Lord was the perversion of the Temple by making what was intended to be a place of communion into a business enterprise. Such was its effect that His disciples recalled the words of Scripture,
“Zeal for your house will consume me.” (Ps. 69: 9)

Jesus’ purification of the Temple is a herald of another kind of purification, the sanctification of our hearts. It was actually His first proclamation about who He really is and what His mission would embrace. Such mood of Jesus is not commonly read in the Gospel, but is a clear reminder of the need to purify ourselves not only at this season, but at all times. And if we do not experience this purification, then everything that we do is a total waste of time. Until our hearts are rid of that which produces our death and destruction, we will never be truly ready for Him and becoming fully happy. He sees our dark side, the pain we are capable of inflicting. Despite that, He sees the beauty and what is beyond: our possibilities, what we are truly capable of, the goodness that we are capable of radiating. His passionate love for us sometimes makes Him turn the tables upside down and cracks the whip to get our attention. He wants to unravel the beauty that is within us, but which is being covered by what is dark and ugly. Case of loving the sinner, but hating the sin!

What makes it deeply comforting is that the Lord understands our human nature because He is fully human. He understands our fickleness and our weaknesses. He also knows we can get distracted from what is pure and authentic into something that’s bright and dazzling. But as long as we truly desire to get better and do better, He is there patiently waiting for us to get up and seek forgiveness from the Father.

This Lenten Season, let us prepare ourselves to be truly ready for Him. As we continue to reflect on this Gospel and the readings that follow, we are asked to choose where we stand in the course of our day-to-day lives. Do we take the side of what is good, true, and faithful to God? Or continue our pursuit of worldly goods that defile our hearts from what is true, pure and lasting?

“Lord, you have the words of everlasting life.” (Jn. 6:68c)